Caledonia

Thomas King’s “The Inconvenient Indian” – A Sometimes Contradictory, But Occasionally Constructive, Rant

A review of Thomas King’s The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America (2012). King (1943-) has Cherokee, Greek and German ancestry. I find he sometimes contradicts himself, but some of his recommendations are constructive.

A Review of Some Aspects of the Blog “Six Nations (Haudenosaunee) & The Haldimand Tract: Beliefs Versus Facts”

A review of some aspects of the blog “Six Nations (Haudenosaunee) & the Halidmand Tract: Beliefs Versus Facts.” DeYo, the blog author, is a resident of Haldimand County in Ontario, Canada. His kinship includes (among others) Delaware, Mohawk and Tyendinaga. He comments on “unresolved land disputes” between the Canadian government and the Haudenosaunee.

Caledonia and Six Nations: Majority Opposed April 28, 2012 “Parade”

Caledonia, Ontario is near the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve in Southern Ontario. There have been ongoing tensions between the two communities relating to Six Nations land claims. My post deals with a dispute in 2012.

Israel Truth Week Conference 2012 and Its Connection With the Caledonia Crisis

The first Israel Truth Week Conference was held in London, Ontario. The conference was founded by Mark Vandermaas in order to draw attention to growing anti-Israel viewpoints in Canadian society, including in connection with a land claims dispute in Caledonia, Ontario. My post includes summaries of some of the presentations made at the conference.

Part Two of Two – A Delectable Lie, a Tree and a Way Forward: Multiculturalism and Aboriginal Policy Compared

I compare the Canadian government’s multiculturalism and Aboriginal policies. I see similarities between Western University political science professor Salim Mansur’s concerns about multiculturalism and the pro-Palestinian/anti-Jewish elements elements of the Caledonia, Ontario land claims dispute.

Aboriginal Issues During the “Culpability Era”

Canadian politicians frequently adhere to cultural relativism doctrine which can make the Indigenous situation worse. It is better to follow advice from Indigenous leaders like Calvin Helin, who recommends that welfare dependency be replaced with self-reliance. Helin also contends that Indigenous communities should develop alternative revenue streams so they are not so reliant on government.